6th grade science project ideas

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Really Good Science Fair Projects

If you want some really good science fair projects, here is a selection of some of the best ideas for science fair projects for several different grade levels. Review these science projects carefully and you will find some proven winners for your next science fair. Make science fun with a winning project. What are you most interested in? Is it biology, chemistry, social science or perhaps physics. There are wonderful science fair ideas in all these topics. The secret to a winning science fair project is to choose a topic you like and find a project to match it. Take a look at these fun science fair project ideas. Start your science fair project today. Each science fair project includes about 15 pages of easy-to-follow directions to help you create your project step-by-step.

Also included in each science fair project::

  • Details about the scientific method
  • List of needed materials
  • Detailed list of step-by-step procedures that are easy to follow
  • Vital information on how to make your presentation
  • Details about "What the judges are looking for"

As a bonus, every project includes 16 free original science games that you can play with all your friends!

There are more all time best science fair projects that you can choose from, actually over 400 other science fair projects. Every subject is covered including chemistry, physics, biology, computer and environmental sciences, and more. Choose it and print it now; start your science fair project right away!


Which frozen liquid will melt the fastest?
Will frozen Pepsi melt as fast as frozen Dr. Pepper? Will frozen milk melt as fast as frozen orange juice. Find out for yourself in this interesting project for lower grades.

400 more winning science fair projects here!


Which has greater acidity (pH), a lemon, an orange, or a grapefruit?
Get your fill of citrus with this easy project for lower grades. It will teach you a lot about pH and citrus fruits, and will be real fun to do. You will need to buy pH testing strips which are readily available and inexpensive.

400 more winning science fair projects here!


What type of tomato has the most acidity (pH)?

This is an easy project for lower grades. It will teach you a lot about pH and tomatoes, and will be real fun to do.

400 more winning science fair projects here!


Can I determine what kind of food ants like the best?

This is a really fun project that will require that you purchase some ants, unless you already have them. They are not expensive. Great for all of you budding scientists who like to deal with living things.

400 more winning science fair projects here!

 

Here is some really good information for science fair about frozen liquids.

Will frozen Pepsi melt as fast as frozen Dr. Pepper? Will frozen milk melt as fast as frozen orange juice. Find out for yourself in this interesting project for lower grades.

The following information may be a little high tech for the average young reader but let's give it a try.

Most liquids freeze by crystallization, formation of crystalline solid from the uniform liquid, which means that as long as solid and liquid coexist, the equilibrium temperature of the system remains constant and equal to the melting point. Crystallization consists of two major events, nucleation and crystal growth. Nucleation is the step where the molecules start to gather into clusters, on the nanometer scale, arranging in a defined and periodic manner that defines the crystal structure. The crystal growth is the subsequent growth of the nuclei that succeed in achieving the critical cluster size.

Crystallization of pure liquids usually begins at lower temperature than the melting point, due to high activation energy of homogeneous nucleation. The creation of a nucleus implies the formation of an interface at the boundaries of the new phase. Some energy is expended to form this interface, based on the surface energy of each phase. If a hypothetical nucleus is too small, the energy that would be released by forming its volume is not enough to create its surface, and nucleation does not proceed. Freezing does not start until the temperature is low enough to provide enough energy to form stable nuclei. In presence of irregularities on the surface of the containing vessel, solid or gaseous impurities, pre-formed solid crystals, or other nucleators, heterogeneous nucleation may occur, where some energy is released by the partial destruction of the previous interface, raising the supercooling point to be near or equal to the melting point. Freezing is an exothermic process, meaning that as liquid changes into solid, heat is released. This is often seen as counter-intuitive, since the temperature of the material does not rise during freezing, except if the liquid was supercooled, but this can be understood since heat must be continually removed from the freezing liquid or the freezing process will stop. The energy released upon freezing is a type of latent heat known as enthalpy of fusion and is exactly the same as the energy required to melt the same amount of the solid.

You can find over 400 more interesting ideas for science fair projects at http://www.terimore.com.

4th grade science project

 

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