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Weird Science Facts

Looking for unique science project ideas or just something cool to do? Try out some weird science topics. Try these on for size: Amazing Cockroaches, Weird Science Facts & Cool Experiments or Are Rocks Really Solid. Read closely, you might find a great idea for your next science fair project!

 

 




Science Experiments - Amazing Cockroaches

Science experiments sometimes find the oddest things. These facts from experiments on this bug will give you some respect for the creepy crawler. Cockroaches have been around for 400 million years. Dinosaurs have come and gone. Entire races of people have come and gone. But cockroaches remain. Would you believe that there are over 4000 different species of the little buggers?

If there is a nuclear attack, we will die, but the cockroaches are likely to live. Humans can withstand a one-time exposure of 5 rems (a radiation measurement) of radiation. A dose of 800 rems will kill a human. A cockroach, on the other hand, can withstand up to 67,500 to 105,000 rems before succumbing. Think of the science experiments conducted that came up with this fact! Next time you chase a cockroach with a can of spray in your hand, you'll feel him laughing at you.

If you cut off its head, it could live for a month without it. And don't try drowning it. The cockroach can hold its breath for 40 minutes. If you try to seal them off, better not leave a space as thin as a dime, because that's all the space that a young roach needs to crawl into. Roaches of certain species can grow to six inches in length with a 12 inch wingspan. If all other sources of food fail you, a cockroach recipe has been offered that advises simmering in vinegar, boiling with butter, farina flour, pepper and salt to make a paste and then spreading on buttered bread.

Roaches can run at speeds of nearly 2 miles an hour. They can make up to 25 body turns in a second - the highest known rate in the animal kingdom. And, being nocturnal, they do most of this in the dark. So why don't they crash into things?

The answer is: their antennae. In a series of cockroach-assault course experiments it was found that these much-loathed insects boast highly flexible and seriously sensitive antennae one and a third times the length of their bodies and segmented into between 150 and 170 jointed sections.

Researchers found in science experiments that blinded and deafened cockroaches were able to navigate completely normally, even if their average speeds were lower than their sighted and air-current-sensitive counterparts.

Cockroaches are considered one of the most successful groups of animals; because they are so adaptable, cockroaches have adjusted to living with humans much more readily than humans have adjusted to living with them.

Cockroaches thrive in nearly every corner of the globe, despite our best attempts to eliminate them.

Why is it almost impossible to squish a cockroach before it shoots out of sight behind the refrigerator while it is often quite easy to zap it with the nozzle of a vacuum cleaner?

The answer is that the jet-propelled bug thinks with its behind. The cockroach is able to sense minute changes in the air flowing round its body using tiny hairs on two posterior appendages called "cerci" and that includes your foot coming down.

The vacuum cleaner, however, has even smart roaches fooled. If a vacuum cleaner approaches from behind a cockroach, the wind goes from its head to the nozzle. It thinks the attack is from the front and it turns round and runs straight into the nozzle.

And if food is scarce, adolescent cockroaches can live on a very reliable resource -- their parent's feces. I don't recommend recreating this particular science experiment.

In the natural world, dodging disaster is vital if you are not going to be pounced on by predators. Now, the world champion dodger has been crowned - the cockroach.

Japan has been able to stimulate the muscles in a cockroach leg with electrical signals so that its movements can be controlled. A tricky science experiment indeed!

There could be big advantages for the military. Rats could be used to check damage at bombed enemy factory sites, where their presence would be unlikely to raise suspicion. Dogs could be used to search for casualties on battlefields and cockroaches could be used to place surveillance devices in military installations.

Among the more futuristic scenarios portrayed in the study, robots called neural network bugs, built like small cockroaches, can crawl to the best location for surveillance. Researchers are now working on controlling and manipulating real cockroaches by implanting microprocessors and electrodes in their bodies. The insects can be fitted with micro-cameras and sensors to reach the places other bugs can't reach.

The most common injury for them to endure is the loss of a leg. If a predator tugs on a cockroach leg it will fall off at a preset point called an autonomy point, similar to a lizard losing its tail as a reflex to being caught by the tail.

Unlike some other insects which will gradually regenerate a leg over several molting cycles, the cockroach will delay its next molt in order to regenerate its leg. This will provide the cockroach with the swift feet necessary to escape the next enemy quickly. Six legs are better than 5 or 4. The fast escape of the cockroach requires the pattern of running which uses a tripod of legs on the ground at any one time.

One person reported that after cooking pizza in the microwave, the microwave was opened and discovered a small roach still alive.

The microwave oven is amazingly non-uniform in its heating. That is why most of them have carousels to keep the food moving through the focus of the power.

The roach found was clearly not at the focus of the microwave's power, otherwise it would have exploded under the heat at the focus. 200 exciting science projects here!

 

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Science Fair Projects - Weird Science Facts!


The average car driver spends about 14 days of his/her life waiting for traffic signals to turn from red to green. If you listened to books on tape while waiting you could "read" about 70 books during this time.

In 1997 about 500 people in China were able to ski. Now in 2007, over 5 million Chinese will spend time on the slopes. Seems like middle class living has reached this ancient country.

If you are right handed, you will live a little longer than left handed people. I wonder what would happen if you were a natural lefty and tried to become right handed through practice. Perhaps a good subject for a health project or a science fair experiment.

The Bank of America was once called the Bank of Italy. Buon giorno you all.

If an ant gets inebriated, it will always fall to its right side. What I want to know is where does an ant get its booze.

Most elephants weigh less than the tongue of the blue whale. If an elephant gets stuck in a blue whale, just tell the whale to cough.

Birds do not sleep in their nests. They may occasionally nap in them, but they actually sleep in other places. I wonder where do the birds sleep if not in their nests.

The formula for cold cream has hardly changed at all in the 1,700 years since it was originally made by the Roman physician Galen. So why do some cold cream cost just a few dollars and other cost almost enough to buy a new Porsche.

Crocodiles and alligators are surprisingly fast on land. Although they are rapid, they are not agile; so if you ever find yourself chased by one, run in a zigzag line. If this doesn't work, the management is not responsible.

Irving Thalberg of MGM had the habit of making people wait outside his office for extended periods. He kept the Marx Brothers longer than they liked. When he finally got around to seeing them, they were stark naked outside his doorway, roasting potatoes in the lobby's fireplace. It was the last time he kept them waiting. After all, they are comedians.

In ancient China and certain parts of India, mouse meat was considered a great delicacy.

In ancient Greece, where the mouse was sacred to Apollo, mice were sometimes devoured by temple priests. Some of these priests were known as "mouse breath".

In the United States, a pound of potato chips costs two hundred times more than a pound of potatoes. It goes to show you that by taking a healthy potato, frying it in fatty oil to help make it unhealthy, ruining the environment with tons of packaging material, and charging a small fortune for the result of this effort, you can make many Americans happy.

Half the foods eaten throughout the world today were developed by farmers in the Andes Mountains. Potatoes, maize, sweet potatoes, squash, all varieties of beans, peanuts, papayas, strawberries, mulberries and many other foods were first grown in this region. I have to believe that the foods were unadulterated, pure and better for you in those olden days.

A giraffe can go without water longer than a camel can. Next time I have to cross the Sahara desert, I will be certain to go by giraffe.

Blue whales weigh as much as 30 elephants and are as long as 3 Greyhound buses.

According to tests made at the Institute for the Study of Animal Problems in Washington, D.C., dogs and cats, like people, are either right-handed or left-handed --- that is, they favor either their right or left paws.

In the marriage ceremony of the ancient Inca Indians of Peru, the couple was considered officially wed when they took off their sandals and handed them to each other.

According to acupuncturists, there is a point on the head that you can press to control your appetite. It is located in the hollow just in front of the flap of the ear. (Try it!)

Tibetans, Mongolians, and people in parts of western China put salt in their tea instead of sugar.

In 1976 a Los Angeles secretary officially married a 50-pound rock. The ceremony was witnessed by more than 20 people.

There is approximately one chicken for every human being in the world.

The average lead pencil will draw a line 35 miles long or write approximately 50,000 English words. More than 2 billion pencils are manufactured each year in the United States. If these were laid end to end they would circle the world nine times.

A rainbow can be seen only in the morning or late afternoon. It can occur only when the sun is 40 degrees or less above the horizon.

In Calama, a town in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it has never rained.

Ants stretch when they wake up. They also appear to yawn in a very human manner before taking up the tasks of the day. Ho hum.

Bees have 5 eyes. There are 3 small eyes on the top of a bee's head and 2 larger ones in front.

A sneeze can travel as fast as 100 miles per hour. Ride a sneeze to work. It will be faster than your car.

It is impossible to sneeze and keep one's eyes open at the same time.
200 exciting science projects here!

 


Christmas Eve Science - What's Science got to do with it!

A recent scientific study was made trying to determine how Santa handles the delivery of all the gifts to so many children.

It was estimated that there are about 2-1/2 billion children in the world under the age of eighteen. We agree that people over eighteen are not on Santa's list to be visited. Of all of these children Santa does not visit Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu and Jewish children, so that leaves about 400 million to be visited with gifts.

If there are about three children to the household, that leaves about 130 million homes to be visited with gifts. We assume that at least one of these kids in each home has been good and deserves Christmas presents. With all the differences in time zones, we give Santa about 32 hours of Christmas time to do his work, assuming he travels from east to west to take advantage of the extra time. In general terms he must make about 1000 visits every second. So we give the old boy about 1/1000 of a second to park, jump out of the sleigh, get up the roof, down the chimney, fill the stockings, put presents under the tree, eat the snacks, get back up the chimney, back into the sleigh and move on to the next house. Of course, we must leave some time for him to sort thru the millions of presents and make certain that he takes the right gifts to the right house.

If we assume that the 130 million homes are equi-distant, he would have to travel about 80 million miles. His sled would have to move at 700 miles a second and considering that reindeer can only run about 15 miles an hour, something has got to go.

Now as to the size of sled. If each little kid gets 3 pounds of toys, the sled will have to carry about a half of a million tons of Christmas presents. We have seen many pictures of Santa's sled and it really doesn't look big enough. The most that a reindeer can pull may be something like three hundred pounds. With this in mind we would need about 300,000 reindeer. Now all this weight traveling at 700 miles a second will generate an awful lot of heat, so much that they would all burst into flames. And poor Santa would be subjected to centrifugal forces beyond belief.

How do we equate all of this scientific stuff and still believe in Santa Claus. It's easy, we either believe or we do not believe. Those who believe get presents. Those who do not believe also get presents. Hey - its a "win-win" but believing makes the win much sweeter!

200 exciting science projects here!


Science Experiments - Amazing Cockroaches

Science experiments sometimes find the oddest things. These facts from experiments on this bug will give you some respect for the creepy crawler. Cockroaches have been around for 400 million years. Dinosaurs have come and gone. Entire races of people have come and gone. But cockroaches remain. Would you believe that there are over 4000 different species of the little buggers?

If there is a nuclear attack, we will die, but the cockroaches are likely to live. Humans can withstand a one-time exposure of 5 rems (a radiation measurement) of radiation. A dose of 800 rems will kill a human. A cockroach, on the other hand, can withstand up to 67,500 to 105,000 rems before succumbing. Think of the science experiments conducted that came up with this fact! Next time you chase a cockroach with a can of spray in your hand, you'll feel him laughing at you.

If you cut off its head, it could live for a month without it. And don't try drowning it. The cockroach can hold its breath for 40 minutes. If you try to seal them off, better not leave a space as thin as a dime, because that's all the space that a young roach needs to crawl into. Roaches of certain species can grow to six inches in length with a 12 inch wingspan. If all other sources of food fail you, a cockroach recipe has been offered that advises simmering in vinegar, boiling with butter, farina flour, pepper and salt to make a paste and then spreading on buttered bread.

Roaches can run at speeds of nearly 2 miles an hour. They can make up to 25 body turns in a second - the highest known rate in the animal kingdom. And, being nocturnal, they do most of this in the dark. So why don't they crash into things?

The answer is: their antennae. In a series of cockroach-assault course experiments it was found that these much-loathed insects boast highly flexible and seriously sensitive antennae one and a third times the length of their bodies and segmented into between 150 and 170 jointed sections.

Researchers found in science experiments that blinded and deafened cockroaches were able to navigate completely normally, even if their average speeds were lower than their sighted and air-current-sensitive counterparts.

Cockroaches are considered one of the most successful groups of animals; because they are so adaptable, cockroaches have adjusted to living with humans much more readily than humans have adjusted to living with them.

Cockroaches thrive in nearly every corner of the globe, despite our best attempts to eliminate them.

Why is it almost impossible to squish a cockroach before it shoots out of sight behind the refrigerator while it is often quite easy to zap it with the nozzle of a vacuum cleaner?

The answer is that the jet-propelled bug thinks with its behind. The cockroach is able to sense minute changes in the air flowing round its body using tiny hairs on two posterior appendages called "cerci" and that includes your foot coming down.

The vacuum cleaner, however, has even smart roaches fooled. If a vacuum cleaner approaches from behind a cockroach, the wind goes from its head to the nozzle. It thinks the attack is from the front and it turns round and runs straight into the nozzle.

And if food is scarce, adolescent cockroaches can live on a very reliable resource -- their parent's feces. I don't recommend recreating this particular science experiment.

In the natural world, dodging disaster is vital if you are not going to be pounced on by predators. Now, the world champion dodger has been crowned - the cockroach.

Japan has been able to stimulate the muscles in a cockroach leg with electrical signals so that its movements can be controlled. A tricky science experiment indeed!

There could be big advantages for the military. Rats could be used to check damage at bombed enemy factory sites, where their presence would be unlikely to raise suspicion. Dogs could be used to search for casualties on battlefields and cockroaches could be used to place surveillance devices in military installations.

Among the more futuristic scenarios portrayed in the study, robots called neural network bugs, built like small cockroaches, can crawl to the best location for surveillance. Researchers are now working on controlling and manipulating real cockroaches by implanting microprocessors and electrodes in their bodies. The insects can be fitted with micro-cameras and sensors to reach the places other bugs can't reach.

The most common injury for them to endure is the loss of a leg. If a predator tugs on a cockroach leg it will fall off at a preset point called an autonomy point, similar to a lizard losing its tail as a reflex to being caught by the tail.

Unlike some other insects which will gradually regenerate a leg over several molting cycles, the cockroach will delay its next molt in order to regenerate its leg. This will provide the cockroach with the swift feet necessary to escape the next enemy quickly. Six legs are better than 5 or 4. The fast escape of the cockroach requires the pattern of running which uses a tripod of legs on the ground at any one time.

One person reported that after cooking pizza in the microwave, the microwave was opened and discovered a small roach still alive.

The microwave oven is amazingly non-uniform in its heating. That is why most of them have carousels to keep the food moving through the focus of the power.

The roach found was clearly not at the focus of the microwave's power, otherwise it would have exploded under the heat at the focus. 200 exciting science projects here!

 


Science Experiments - Are Rocks Really Solid?

Looking for a great science experiment? How about an Earth Science project? Have you heard the expression "as solid as a rock". Hold up just a minute there; rocks are not quite as solid as most of us believe. Rocks have little pockets of air inside them. Have you ever looked at a piece of volcanic rock? The air pockets are really easy to see. But even in very dense rocks like granite for example, there are tiny pockets of air inside. This is a great subject for an interesting science experiment!

One way to tell the difference in rocks is to pick up two rocks of about the same size. One rock is volcanic and the other rock is granite. You will quickly discern that the granite rock is heavier. This is because it is denser, has smaller air pockets and therefore weighs more than the volcanic rock which is less dense and has bigger air pockets.

You can do an experiment where you will investigate the difference in rocks to see which are more porous, leaving more room for air and gas, and weighing less.

Of what practical interest is a science fair project on the earth science of rocks? The porosity of rock is important to all industries that use rock. In road building, in oil and gas exploration and in many other industries, the porosity of rock is a factor that looms large.

There are many factors that influence rock porosity. In this science experiment you will investigate the effect of particle size on porosity by making a model to test your hypothesis. You will attempt to determine which particles leave the most space and make a more porous matrix, small particles or large particles.

You will attempt to determine how porosity is related to particle size, how much space is left between particles of rock or soil, and how porosity can be measured.

For this experiment you will need clear plastic cups, water, a permanent marker, a measuring cup, and different size rock particles. You want about seven or eight different rock samples. You can get them from your garden, or from a landscape or construction supply company. Get different sizes. Fill each plastic cup with your samples and label the cups with the size of the particles.

Fill your measuring cup with water to the 100 milliliter mark. Pour water into the first sample until full. Make careful records of the amount of water left in the measuring cup. Record your results in a table. Determine the amount of empty space in the sample.

You should subtract the amount of water you measured from 100 ml. If after pouring water into the sample cup, there was 60 ml of water left, you would subtract 60 ml from 100 ml. You will have determined that there is a volume of 40 ml of space between the particles in your cup.

Repeat the above procedures for each sample. Make a chart to compare your results. Which sample had the most empty space. Which sample had the least.

Do you see a relationship between particle size and pore space? You can vary this experiment by using other materials like volcanic rock, or limestone or sandstone or quartz. You may also wish to try using different soils like clay, loam or sandy soil.

In case you are wondering why there are so many different kinds of rocks you may be interested in knowing that all rocks are formed and categorized as being igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic.

For thousands, even millions of years, little pieces of our earth have been eroded--broken down and worn away by wind and water. These little bits of our earth are washed downstream where they settle to the bottom of the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Layer after layer of eroded earth is deposited on top of each.

Igneous rocks are called fire rocks and are formed either underground or above ground. Underground, they are formed when the melted rock, called magma, deep within the earth becomes trapped in small pockets. As these pockets of magma cool slowly underground, the magma becomes igneous rocks.

Igneous rocks are also formed when volcanoes erupt, causing the magma to rise above the earth's surface. When magma appears above the earth, it is called lava. Igneous rocks are formed as the lava cools above ground.

Sedimentary rocks are formed in two ways. Some are formed by pressing together or compacting loose particles which have been deposited on land or in water bodies such as seas or lakes. These loose particles are called sediments. Other sedimentary rocks are formed by the crystallization of dissolved minerals.

Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have "morphed" into another kind of rock. These rocks were once igneous or sedimentary rocks. The rocks are under tons and tons of pressure, which fosters heat build up, and this causes them to change. If you exam metamorphic rock samples closely, you'll discover how flattened some of the grains in the rock. Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have "morphed" into another kind of rock.

Now when you hear the expression "as solid as a rock", you'll know just how solid rocks really are. Challenging popular notions, such as the "solid as a rock" expression, make great science experiments. This one will interest a lot of people and teach them about the elements of our planet Earth. 200 exciting science projects here!

 
 

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